Jack Fincham mobbed by female fans during London night out without Dani Dyer following his cocaine shame

The 27-year-old chatted to the girls after being mobbed on the street, days after admitting snorting cocaine to The Sun.


Our exclusive pictures show Love Island favourite Jack speaking to one girl in particular as he smoked a cigarette in the doorway of a newsagent.

The pair were snapped chatting, smiling and – at one point – shaking hands as they hung out on the busy street corner.

He was later accosted by no fewer than six girls outside a Caffe Nero, where he obligingly paused to pose for selfies with the mob, all the while chatting away on his phone.

The same thing happened round the corner outside the Dodo Supermarket, where a group of young women jostled to meet the telly star.




Last week Jack admitted he had taken drugs during a "blowout" night out where he partied with Adam Collard and Sam Bird.

He told The Sun: “I’d never normally be in these situations but, yes, since winning the show I have been offered cocaine a lot.

“But I went out all night, I was drinking and I just got ­carried away and made a stupid, stupid mistake which I wish I’d never done, you know. I regret it.”

He confessed what he'd done down the phone to 22-year-old Dani, who was on the other side of the world filming for Comic Relief in Africa.




Jack added: “She doesn’t like all that. But obviously, she’ll always support me. She said: ‘I’ll always support you, you made a mistake, we all make mistakes, but don’t ever do it again.’"

Indeed, Dani did more than forgive him, with the pair risking flouting public decency laws when she returned home.

They engaged in an X-rated clinch in the window of their London flat with the curtains wide open.

As one onlooker joked: "However annoyed Dani was about Jack’s cocaine use and partying, she seems to have well and truly forgiven him."


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Female war reporter savages new film about Marie Colvin’s life

‘You can’t call this a biopic’: Female war reporter slams new film about Marie Colvin saying it gets facts wrong, ERASES her ex and gives her a ‘Bridget Jones-style’ best friend she didn’t have

  • American war reporter Marie Colvin was killed in Homs, Syria in 2011 
  • New film A Private War documents her life travelling to conflict zones 
  • However, fellow war reporter Janine di Giovanni says the biopic isn’t realistic
  • She criticises artistic licence used to portray Colvin’s friends, family and editors 

It’s been hailed by critics but a new Hollywood film about the life of American War reporter Marie Colvin has been called ‘confusing’ and ‘not a biopic’ by her close friend.

A Private War, starring Rosamund Pike and directed by Matthew Heineman, documents the life of Colvin, who filed reports from conflict zones and was killed in Homs, Syria in 2012.

Following the film’s release in the US, Colvin’s close friend and fellow female war correspondent, Janine di Giovanni, has slammed the film for using artistic licence in the way key figures in Colvin’s life are portrayed. 

Writing in Harper’s Magazine, di Giovanni says the film is inaccurate in parts and offers a Hollywood spin on Colvin’s life.  

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Rosamund Pike stars as US war reporter Marie Colvin in new film A Private War. However, Colvin’s long-time friend and colleague has slammed the movie, saying it’s put a Hollywood spin on the journalist’s life

Colvin was killed in Syria in 2011, just hours after she’d filed a report on the army’s shelling of ‘a city of cold, starving civilians’. She lost her eye in 2001 after being hit by the Sri Lankan army

Author and foreign correspondent Janine di Giovanni has criticised Matthew Heineman’s film, saying many of the people in Colvin’s life – including her former employees and boyfriend – were portrayed as ‘good guys’ when in reality they weren’t

She said Covin’s employees at the Sunday Times were not the ‘good guys’ they’re portrayed to be in the film and that many of the characters are merely composites of real people.  

‘Colvin had many friends in London, but none of them were similar to the Bridget Jones–style girlfriend character (portrayed by Nikki Amuka-Bird) in the film. 

‘Her last boyfriend was not a caring and loving Stanley Tucci but rather a man who gave her immense heartache and distress.’


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Author and journalist di Giovanni also criticised some basic factual changes including a reference made by Colvin’s first husband, Patrick Bishop, to ‘heads on sticks’ in the opening scene of the film. 

She writes: There were no ‘heads on sticks’ in Bosnia, as the character meant to be Colvin’s first husband, Patrick Bishop, says in one of the opening scenes (heads were on sticks in Chechnya).’

The film is the first narrative feature by Matt Heineman and has been well received in the US following its release in early November

However, Janine di Giovanni says that while she ‘respects’ the film paying tribute to her friend, she doesn’t want young girls to think that war reporting is glamorous 

Marie Colvin, 56 at the time of her death, was born in the US but lived in Hammersmith, London, writing for the Sunday Times

Colvin, pictured in Chechnya in 1999, lost the sight in her left eye after being struck by the Sri Lankan army in 2011

And Colvin’s second husband, Juan Carlos Gumucio, an obviously important figure in her life, is ‘erased from the script altogether’.

di Giovanni concludes though that she still ‘respects’ the film for paying testament to the courage and legacy of her friend but adds: ‘I just don’t want young women to watch it and think that being a war reporter is glamorous’. 

Colvin became known for her distinctive eye patch and tragically died during a rocket attack in 2012 while covering the civil war in Syria – just hours after telling the world how Bashar al-Assad’s army was ‘simply shelling a city of cold, starving civilians’.

A Private War chronicles her life’s work and is adapted from Marie Brenner’s 2012 Vanity Fair article Marie Colvin’s Private War.

Marie’s family have since launched legal action against the Syrian government. charging it with arranging her death in 2012.

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Two more Marvel female characters confirmed to have survived Avengers: Infinity War snap

While we might not have an Avengers 4 trailer yet, we do continue to hear about Marvel characters who survived Infinity War.

Last week, it was revealed that new Marvel novel The Cosmic Quest Volume Two: Aftermath confirmed that Thor‘s Dr Erik Selvig and Darcy Lewis survived. Now, thanks to Nerdist, we know that the novel also sees the pair meet up with Jane Foster.

Foster hasn’t been seen in the MCU since Thor: The Dark World, but star Natalie Portman hasn’t ruled out a return, so could this be a sign that she’ll help out the remaining Avengers in next year’s sequel?

Like before, it’s worth noting that the novel hasn’t been officially considered canon, but it follows Infinity War closely and does fit the MCU timeline.

And along with the Foster news, we also got confirmation that Pepper Potts has survived, thanks to Deadline. They reported that Gwyneth Paltrow will appear in Avengers 4 and she’ll have “armour of her own”.

Paltrow had been spotted on set, so this confirmation shouldn’t be too much of a surprise. Although if the Russo Brothers wanted to be extra cruel, Pepper might only appear in flashbacks and will be shown disintegrating into dust…

It’s expected that we’ll finally get a first look at Avengers 4 this week, but nothing has been confirmed, although we will be getting a second Captain Marvel trailer.

Avengers: Infinity War is out now on Blu-ray, DVD and digital download. Avengers 4 arrives in cinemas in the UK on April 26, 2019, and in the US on May 3, 2019.

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