Sharon Osbourne says granddaughter tested positive for COVID-19

‘Children can get COVID!’ Sharon Osbourne reveals she’s in quarantine after her granddaughter Minnie, three, tested positive for coronavirus… but insists the family is ‘doing good’

  • The 67-year old told her fellow panelists that her relatives were in good health amid the family scare
  • The positive result means Minnie will be forced to isolate for 14-days – the time between exposure to the virus and its initial symptoms
  • Those who have had contact with Minnie and are yet to undergo testing will also be required to quarantine for the duration of its incubation period
  • Sharon did not specify whether husband Ozzy, 71, who revealed his Parkinson’s Disease diagnosis in January, has also been tested  

Sharon Osbourne said she quarantined from her CBS panel show The Talk Monday after her three-year-old granddaughter Minnie tested positive for COVID-19.

The 67-year old told her fellow panelists that her relatives were in good health amid the family scare, including her son Jack – Minnie’s father – who is living with multiple sclerosis.

‘I was meant to be in the studio, I was so looking forward to it,’ Osbourne, 67, said while appearing remotely on the show.  

The latest: Sharon Osbourne, 67, said she quarantined from her CBS panel show The Talk Monday after her three-year-old granddaughter Minnie tested positive for COVID-19

‘And then, unfortunately, one of my granddaughters has come down with COVID. She’s okay; she’s doing good. I don’t have it.’ 

‘Her daddy doesn’t have it. Her mommy doesn’t have it. Her sisters don’t. She got it from somebody who works for my son. And it just goes to show you, she’s three years of age, that children can get COVID.’ 

The positive result means Minnie will be forced to isolate for 14-days – the time between exposure to the virus and its initial symptoms – in accordance with current health regulations.  

Those who have had contact with Minnie and are yet to undergo testing will also be required to quarantine for the duration of its incubation period. 

Update: Osbourne told her fellow panelists that her relatives were in good health amid the family scare, including her son (and Minnie’s father) Jack, who is living with multiple sclerosis

Sharon did not specify whether husband Ozzy, 71, who revealed his Parkinson’s Disease diagnosis in January, has also been tested for the potentially fatal disease. 

Ozzy’s condition – a chronic and progressive movement disorder – coupled with his age makes him a higher risk should he be exposed to COVID-19. 

Despite the setback, Sharon said her heart was with The Talk on it’s 11th season debut, but she was acting out of caution amid the pandemic and following safety protocols.  

Osbourne said her heart was with the show on it’s 11th season debut, but she was acting out of caution amid the pandemic, and following safety protocols 

Staying the course: Sharon said that she’s tested negative for the virus but was following protocols 

‘Oh my Lord, I want to see you guys so bad,’ she said. ‘I’ve got one more week left of quarantining and then I’m out.

‘And as I say, I don’t have it. I keep testing negative, but, you know, you have to be safe.’

Sheryl Underwood asked Sharon, ‘Sharon, did Jack ask about me? He may need me to come and quarantine with him.’

She replied that Jack was ‘equally as upset because he was planning on coming to the studio with me just to wish you good luck.’

It’s been a challenging year health-wise for the famed family, with husband Ozzy unaware of his Parkinson’s diagnosis until last year.

She said of her granddaughter’s postitive test, ‘It just goes to show you, she’s three years of age, that children can get COVID-19’

‘I’m not good at secrets. I cannot walk around with it anymore,’ he said in a January appearance. ‘I feel better now of owning up to the fact that I have a case of Parkinson’s.’

The show’s 11th season debuted Monday, with hosts Underwood, Eve and Carrie Ann Inaba present.

As of Monday, on a global level, 962,232 people have died amid 31,180,434 positive diagnoses worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University. The death total for COVID-19 in the U.S. was at 199,756 people, with 6,830,209 total positive diagnoses.

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