Ex-topless model, 27, is sent HUNDREDS of sexual images over social media – as she calls for an end to 'cyber flashing'

A FORMER glamour model has called for an end to cyber flashing after she revealed she is sent hundreds of sexual images over social media.

Jess Davies, 27, said she has been the victim of cyber flashing for the past ten years.


Cyber flashing is the act of sending or recording images and videos of genitals and sex acts online without consent.

There is now law in place in England and Wales that directly deals with cyber flashing despite it having been made illegal in Scotland over a decade ago.

Davies, from Aberystwyth, Wales, told the BBC that she is left feeling "dirty" when she receives the pictures.

"I am probably cyber-flashed every month, maybe more, depends really on what I share," she told the BBC.

"This has been going on for 10 years. I've probably received literally hundreds of these images.

"The kind of stuff I get is close-up shots, or of them performing a sex act.

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"When I receive the images it makes you feel a bit dirty and you start thinking, 'why me? Why have they sent them to me, is it something I've done'?"

The feminist podcaster, who has 152,000 followers on Instagram, says that she has almost become "numb" to the pictures she is sent.

"If you had thousands of men flashing you in the street, that's illegal, and that would be a huge problem and a huge conversation, so why are we accepting it online?" she said.

"The individuals who find it okay to send images of their genitals and sex acts to someone should be investigated, we know that public flashing leads to more serious crimes as seen in the tragic cases of Sarah Everard and Libby Squire.

"That same energy should stay for the perpetrators of online violence. ⁣

"We need to stop normalising this criminal act and I will continue to campaign for cyber-flashing to be made illegal in England and Wales for the safety of women."

Cyber flashing became increasingly common during the pandemic after Brits spent more time online, campaigners have said.

Research conducted by YouGov found that four in ten millennial women have been sent a picture of a man's genitals without consent.

Data from the dating app Bumble suggested the figure could be 48 per cent of those aged 18 to 24.

It comes as a joint committee of MPs is set to publish its report of the draft Online Safety Bill – aimed at introducing tougher restrictions for social media companies.

Cyber flashing is not included in the bill but campaigners are hoping it will be added.

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