Grade I listed mansion goes up for auction for £1.95M

Perfect for a Bridgerton ball! Grade I listed mansion with nine bedrooms that dates back to the Domesday book is expected to fetch £1.95M at auction (and it’s even hosted royalty)

  • Grade I listed mansion that spans 14,000sqft  in Nottinghamshire is up for auction for £1.95million 
  • South Wing at Clifton Hall in Nottinghamshire boasts nine bedrooms throughout the property and is thought to be one of the most outstanding listed buildings in the area, nestled within the charming Clifton Village 

A stunning Grade I listed mansion that spans 14,000sqft and sits in almost two acres of countryside is expected to fetch £1.95million at auction.

The South Wing at Clifton Hall, in Nottinghamshire, boasts nine bedrooms and is thought to be one of the most outstanding listed buildings in the area, nestled within the charming Clifton village.

With history dating back to the Domesday Book, estate agents Nestseekers, which is selling the property, says stepping inside is like ‘being transported to the set of one of London’s high society balls’.

The Hall once welcomed King Charles I, with the designated Pages’ Room on hand for the King’s pages to sleep.

While it seems a perfect period property, such a rich history has put some previous owners off, with one fleeing because they believed it was haunted.  

The South Wing at Clifton Hall, in Nottinghamshire, boasts nine bedrooms and is thought to be one of the most outstanding listed buildings in the area. Above, the exterior offers a glimpse at some of the almost two acres of land 

The grand entrance hall in the property boasts enough room for a piano and is sure to make an impression on visitors walking through the door. It recalls the regal entrances and staircases of the homes in Netflix’s Bridgerton 

The Great Chamber, pictured, also known as the drawing room, which was completed in 1632 and is still steeped in character and period features

There are nine spacious bedrooms, including the one above, some of which appear to be the size of a typical flat elsewhere in the country. One of the bedrooms played host to King Charles I

The home was occupied for only eight months by millionaire businessman Anwar Rashid and his family before they handed the property to his bank claiming it was full of ghosts. 

According to legend, a woman dressed in white jumped from a window to her death hundreds of years ago. 

The manor of Clifton was noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 and the Clifton family inhabited the manor for over 700 years before it was passed to new ownership in 1958. 

Mr Rashid, his wife Nabila, and their four children bought the house in Clifton, Nottinghamshire, in November 2006, and said the first experience of paranormal activity came hours after the family moved in.

He claims the house then remained quiet for several months until one of the maids said she saw a grey figure sitting on her bed and claimed the ghosts started to take on the form of his children.

The manor of Clifton was noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 and the Clifton family inhabited the manor for over 700 years before it was passed to new ownership in 1958. One of the bathrooms is pictured

Rich in history, the home has a fire place with the Clifton Family crest inside The Great Chamber room which was once played host to musical performances, banquets, and dances.

‘On one occasion my wife went downstairs to make milk for the baby at 5am and she saw our eldest daughter watching TV,’ the businessman said at the time. 

When his wife went back to check on their child upstairs, she found her ‘fast asleep in bed’. The family also found ‘red blood spots on the baby’s quilt’ and left that day. 

But if guests at the manor can put paranormal fears aside, they will be immediately be wowed by the Octagon entrance hall – which is a staggering 44ft high and features a magnificent domed ceiling in the hall’s former watchtower.     

There is also a Great Chamber, also known as the drawing room, which was completed in 1632 and a Red Room (also known as the Silk Room), which was once used by Lady Clifton to hang red silks that were brought back from China.

The Clifton family sat in local offices and served as Members of Parliament and had a good relationship with the royal family. 

The ground floor also boasts a further five reception rooms and an elegant drawing room as well as a kitchen (pictured) features with classically styled island that overlooks the landscaped gardens to the south

The home features  life-size statues of the Roman Gods Neptune, Apollo, Diana and Bacchus (pictured inside the hall)

While the history of Clifton Hall dates back to the 11th century, the Hall was remodelled in the late 18th century. The living room is pictured

They trace their lineage back to Alvaredus de Clifton, a Norman knight who was appointed Warden of Nottingham Castle in the time of William the Conqueror, and who took his name from the south Nottinghamshire village in which he settled. 

Sir Gervase de Clifton purchased the manors of Clifton and Wilford from the de Rodes family in the late 13th century.

His unusual Christian name would be handed down to eleven other prominent members of the Clifton family. 

One such Sir Gervase de Clifton was very popular in the court of Queen Elizabeth I, who referred to him as ‘Gervase The Gentle’. 

He had a reputation as an impeccably courteous man ‘of great authority in peace and war’. 

In 1544 he fought in France at the siege of Boulogne and in 1569 he defended Doncaster from a group of noblemen rebelling against Queen Elizabeth. His tomb chest is to be found St. Mary’s Church, adjacent to Clifton Hall.  

Exposed beam is one of the many historical elements of the property, one of the bedrooms is pictured

On the first floor, an impressive wood-panelled master bedroom with an en-suite bathroom has fabulous views of the grounds. Four more stunning bedrooms, tastefully decorated, have access to three very large bathrooms (pictured)

Later, Charles I visited the property to see another Sir Gervase Clifton, who was one of the first people to have a Baronet created for them by King James I, in 1632 or 1633.

A brief reference is made to another Lord of the Manor –  Sir John Clifton –  in Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part 1. 

In Act 5, Scene 4 when Douglas casts doubt on King Henry’s right to be King. Prince Henry interrupts them and Douglas flees, at which point the Prince conveys the news that Sir Nicholas Gawsey and Sir John Clifton have sent requests for support. 

While the history of Clifton Hall dates back to the 11th century, the Hall was remodelled in the late 18th century.

The property was used as a grammar school before Nottingham Trent University used the hall until 2000.   

The home is privately accessed and set at the top of a gravelled driveway with landscaped gardens overlooking the River Trent and mature, established woodlands sheltering the generous lawned landscape. 

Inside is life-size statues of the Roman Gods Neptune, Apollo, Diana and Bacchus. 

The property was used as a grammar school before Nottingham Trent University used the hall until 2000. The home is privately accessed and set at the top of a gravelled driveway with landscaped gardens overlooking the River Trent and mature, established woodlands sheltering the generous lawned landscape.

The ground floor also boasts a further five reception rooms and an elegant drawing room as well as a kitchen features with classically styled island that overlooks the landscaped gardens to the south.

On the first floor, an impressive wood-panelled master bedroom with an en-suite bathroom has fabulous views of the grounds. Four more stunning bedrooms, tastefully decorated, have access to three very large bathrooms.

The top floor hosts another five bedrooms and three bathrooms as well as a large playroom and reception room has striking exposed beams and low-level windows giving the room a real character.   

Andrew Parker, Managing Director and Auctioneer at SDL Property Auctions, said: ‘It is fantastic to see a property such as Clifton Hall come to auction – it really is a sight to behold and almost has to be seen to be believed. 

‘At SDL Property Auctions, we pride ourselves on being able to bring any property to auction – from two-up two-down terraces to period estates such as this – it will be fascinating to see what it achieves’.

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