Floyd Mayweather's next opponent Money Kicks has no fear of fighting on HELIPAD 210m above ground as he loves skydiving

YOUTUBER 'Money Kicks' has NO fear of fighting Floyd Mayweather 210 meters above sea on a HELIPAD… because he is already a thrill seeker.

The online vlogger is in the final stages of talks with American legend Mayweather for a boxing exhibition on February 20.



And what is most surprising about the shock bout is that it is set to be staged on top of the 700ft Burj Al Arab Jumeirah hotel helipad in Dubai.

If sharing the ring with one of the greatest fighters of all time was not daunting enough, an opponent afraid of heights would be hopeless.

But the son of a billionaire construction mogul Money Kicks – real name Rashed Belhasa – evidently has no such panic.

He told SunSport: "I did skydiving, I'm not scared!

"But it's a different experience, but it's not my event, it's Floyd's event.

"So when they told me they're going to do an event on the helipad, I was like, 'That's crazy'."

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Mayweather's unbeaten 50-0 career needs no introduction but for Belhasa he is as green in the sport as it comes.

Only inspired to fight following the rise of American brothers Logan and Jake Paul, 26 and 25 respectively, has had two wins in the ring.

They came against Anas Elshayib and Ajmal Khan on the celebrity boxing banner 'Social Knockout' – which Money Kicks co-owns.

But he will now be stepping into Mayweather's world – which means not having to shell out a penny from his pocket.

Belhasa said: "I have my own event with my media company, Social Knockout, we started that.

"That's my event. So people are confused, they think I'm going to give Floyd fifty million, I'm not paying nothing."

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Mayweather, 44, officially hung up the gloves in 2017 after beating ex-UFC champion Conor McGregor, 33, in a lucrative crossover fight.

But he has returned twice since, both in exhibitions, starting with a one round demolition job over featherweight kickboxer Tenshin Nasukawa, 23.

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More recently, in June the retired icon was taken the distance over eight rounds by YouTuber Logan Paul, 26, who weighed TWO STONE more.

The former five-weight boxing champion boasted before and after of earning $100million (£72m) for what he called 'a legalised bank robbery'.

But while Belhasa cannot speculate how much their spectacle will make – he knows it will be more than enough to convince Mayweather back into the ring.

He said: "Floyd is about the money, I know Floyd.

"Floyd's going to make m's (millions) no joke. Or Floyd will not go in the ring, he's the best in the world."


Belhasa's entrepreneur dad Saif Ahmed is one of the wealthiest businessmen in the UAE and has afforded his son a life of luxury.

That includes supercars, celebrity meetings and a private zoo which has seen sports stars including Mayweather visit.

So transitioning to the gruelling world of boxing on the surface looks like a questionable choice.

But for Belhasa, the move was about breaking out on his own accord and becoming a trailblazer for boxing in the Middle East.

He explained: "I just wanted to build my own name, build my own empire.

"I wanted to be the first boxer from the Middle East, because there's like no big boxers over here.

"I was like let me start something. I love challenges, I love hard work. It's something risky – you can put everything on the line – you can lose everything.

"But I like that pressure." `



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