Piers Morgan responds as Good Morning Britain outburst breaks Ofcom records



Harry and Meghan’s Oprah interview: Key moments

  • Meghan says it was Kate who made her cry over flower girls, not other way round
  • Meghan says Harry was told there were ‘concerns how dark’ Archie would be
  • Harry and Meghan reveal the gender of their baby due in summer
  • Meghan sobs as she says pressures of royal life drove her to the verge of suicide
  • Prince Charles stopped taking Harry’s calls after he quit Royal Family
  • Harry says Meghan saved him from being ‘trapped’ like Prince Charles and Prince William are
  • Princess Diana would be ‘sad and angry about how this has panned out’
  • Meghan and Harry share adorable new video of son Archie at the beach
  • Harry confirms terrible rift with William and says their relationship is now just ‘space’
  • Queen ‘ghosted Harry during Megxit talks and got aide to say she was too busy’

What is Ofcom and what does it cover?

Ofcom is the regulator for the communications services that we use and rely on each day.

The watchdog makes sure people get the best from their broadband, home phone and mobile services, as well as keeping an eye on TV and radio.

Ofcom deals with most content on television, radio and video-on-demand services, including the BBC. However, if your complaint is about something you saw or heard in a BBC programme, you may need to complain to the BBC first.

Its rules for television and radio programmes are set out in the Broadcasting Code.

The rules in the Broadcasting Code also apply to the BBC iPlayer.

This Broadcasting Code is the rule book that broadcasters have to follow and it covers a number of areas, including; protecting the under-18s, protecting audiences from harmful and/or offensive material and ensuring that news, in whatever form, is reported with due accuracy and presented with due impartiality.

Audiences can complain to Ofcom if they believe a breach of the Broadcasting Code has been made.

Every time Ofcom receives a complaint from a viewer or listener, they assess it to see if it needs further investigation.

If Ofcom decide to investigate, they will include the case in a list of new investigations, published in the Broadcast and On Demand Bulletin.

An investigation is a formal process which can take some time depending on the complexity of the issues involved.

Ofcom can also launch investigations in the absence of a complaint from a viewer or listener.

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