Bonfire Night 2021 – Thugs launch fireworks at cops & injure officers in chaotic scenes as events continue TONIGHT

LAST night, shocking scenes saw fireworks being launched at police as hundreds of anti-Government protesters descended on the streets of London.

Anarchists took to Parliament Square donning Guy Fawkes masks and setting off flares during the annual Million Mask March.

A dozen people were arrested during the protest and eight officers were injured, police confirmed, calling the actions by rioters "unacceptable".

In the footage, posted to Twitter, police are seen clashing with protesters as fireworks spiral into the crowd.

The Met Police confirmed bystanders were "struck" by fireworks and warned of "very serious injuries".

Read our Bonfire Night live blog below for the very latest updates…

  • Milica Cosic

    Who invented fireworks?

    Fireworks are incredibly ancient – they were first used in China during the Song dynasty between 960 and 1279.

    Firework making was a respected skill and the first rockets were made from rolled sheets of paper containing gunpowder and a fuse.

    Knowledge of the technique gradually drifted west as Arab explorers began moving east in the Middle Ages and bringing the knowledge back.

    Fireworks were first recorded in Europe by the late 14th century and became popular during the 17th century – just in time for Guy Fawkes’ night.

  • Milica Cosic

    Scarred for life

    A boy scarred for life after a firework accident when he was little has spoke out about to warn others about protecting children near displays.

    Ben McCabe, 14, said medics are continuing to treat injuries to his chest, neck and right arm with skin grafts TEN YEARS after he suffered third degree burns from a stray rocket.

    He spoke out about the horror at a family gathering as he urged others to attend organised Bonfire Night displays.

    Ben, of Cumbernauld, said: “If there isn’t one on, think twice about the risks of a home display.

    “A few moments of excitement can have a lifetime of consequences.

    “I’ve had multiple ops with more to come and need regular treatments to keep my skin supple.”

    Alasdair Perry, of the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, added: “We are appealing to the public to attend organised events rather than do-it-yourself fireworks displays.”

  • Milica Cosic

    Is it illegal to use fireworks?

    It is illegal for anyone under the age of 18 to buy, handle or set up an firework more powerful than a sparkler.

    It is also illegal to set off fireworks between 11pm and 7am except on special occasions.

    Bonfire Night is one of the exceptions were fireworks can be used till midnight.

    For New Year’s Eve, Diwali and Chinese New Year the cut off is 1am.

  • Milica Cosic

    Can I let off fireworks on my rented property?

    Tenancy agreements often prohibit bonfires or fireworks, so check your agreement or ask your landlord if you are unsure.

    It is legal for a landlord to ban the use of fireworks in a tenancy agreement.

    Your agreement may also state that you must not engage in antisocial behaviour or cause noise pollution, which may include letting off fireworks.

    It is, therefore, a good idea to check with your landlord and neighbours if you plan to hold a fireworks display.

  • Milica Cosic

    Shocking moment fireworks explode over football pitch

    THIS is the shocking moment a spray of fireworks exploded across a football pitch in the middle of a game.

    Players were forced to flee as the spray of sparks – thought to have been let off by idiot yobs – rain down on the Irish top flight match 15 minutes in.

    In shocking footage of the incident, Waterford midfielder Anthony Wordsworth appears to be struck by one of the flying explosives.

    The 32-year-old can be seen clutching his face before sinking to his knees and doubling over in pain.

    As other players flock to his aide, another barrage of fireworks is let off and Wordsworth is struck again.

    In shocking footage of the scenes a commentator can be heard saying: "This is what we just don't need. This is bad, bad, bad."

    Read the article in full here.

  • Milica Cosic

    Who was behind the attack?

    The main, known, plotters were:

    • Robert Catesby (the ringleader)
    • Guy “Guido” Fawkes (the guy who got caught)
    • Thomas Bates,
    • Robert Wintour
    • Thomas Wintour
    • Thomas Percy
    • Christopher Wright
    • John Wright
    • Francis Tresham (believed to have been the one who gave it away)
    • Everard Digby
    • Ambrose Rookwood
    • Robert Keyes
    • Hugh Owen
    • John Grant

    Explained: What was the Gunpowder Plot?

    The revolutionaries had hoped for better treatment from the new monarch James I after 45 years of hounding under the reign of Elizabeth I, and decided on drastic measures when things did not improve under his reign.

    Warwickshire-born Catholic Robert Catesby and his friends planned to kill the King, his ministers and scores of nobles by blowing up the Palace of Westminster during the State Opening of Parliament on November 5, 1605.

    The plotters rented a house nearby and managed to smuggle 36 barrels of gunpowder – around 2.5 tons – into a cellar under the palace ready to blow it sky high.

    The explosives were discovered with hours to spare after an anonymous tip-off warning one peer to stay away.

    To this day the cellars under the Houses of Parliament are ceremonially searched before the annual State Opening.

    The best bonfires in London and the South East

    Alexandra Palace Fireworks Festival 2021 – November 6 & 7

    Battersea Park Fireworks Show – November 6 & 7

    Musical Fireworks Display, Wimbledon Park – November 5 & 6

    Leeds Castle Firework Spectacular, Maidstone – November 6 & 7

    Hatch Warren Firework Display Extravaganza, Basingstoke – November 6

    Safety is key

    Bonfire Night is fun for the whole family – but it can be dangerous.

    The Royal Society for Prevention of Accidents has annual campaigns to encourage people to encourage the night safely.

    Some of its top tips include not standing too close to any bonfire, going to organised fireworks displays rather than in someone’s back garden and keeping anything more powerful than a sparkler away from children.

    • Milica Cosic

      How long have we used fireworks?

      Fireworks are incredibly ancient – they were first used in China during the Song dynasty between 960 and 1279.

      Firework making was a respected skill and the first rockets were made from rolled sheets of paper containing gunpowder and a fuse.

      Knowledge of the technique gradually drifted west as Arab explorers began moving east in the Middle Ages and bringing the knowledge back.

      Fireworks were first recorded in Europe by the late 14th century and became popular during the 17th century – just in time for Guy Fawkes’ night.

    • Milica Cosic

      Urgent warning issued to millions with asthma ahead of this weekend

      BRITS with asthma have been warned to start taking measures to protect themselves now in order to avoid a deadly attack this bonfire weekend.

      Particles of smoke caused by fireworks and bonfires could trigger symptoms in 3million asthma sufferers – making it hard for them to breathe.

      The particles of smoke can irritate the airways, causing sufferers to become inflamed and tighten.

      This results in coughing and wheezing and could result in a fatal asthma attack.

      If you are planning on going to a bonfire and firework display, you should stand well back and make sure you have your blue inhaler, usually the reliver inhaler, with you at all times.

    • Milica Cosic

      Make sure you know the fireworks code

      1.  Never buy fireworks from unlicensed retailers. These fireworks may be unsafe and illegal.

      2.   Avoid setting fireworks off late at night. Be considerate – let your neighbours know you will be having a display, especially if they are elderly or they have pets or children.

      3.  Always keep fireworks in a closed box. Take them out one at a time and close the box.

      4.   Never throw fireworks or put them in your pocket.

      5.  Ensure your pets are safe. There’s expert advice available at petsathome.com

      6.  Carefully follow the instructions on each firework. Never go back to a lit firework unless the instructions advise otherwise

      7.   Never give sparklers to a child under the age of five. Light sparklers one at a time and wear suitable gloves, even when lighting them.

      8.   Never throw spent fireworks on a bonfire.

    • Milica Cosic

      Potato spark

      One mum has shared her savvy trick to stop little fingers getting burnt on Bonfire night.

      Francesca Ross uploaded a photo showing how she sticks potatoes on the end of sparklers for her children to hold instead of the metal end.

      She wrote on the Facebook group Family Lowdown Tips & Ideas: “With bonfire night coming up I thought I’d share the potato trick we just did for the sparklers.

      “Worked amazing for the little toddlers.”

      Her post has racked up over a thousand likes, with one person writing: “Great idea!”

      Another added: “I find carrots and parsnips work best…abit longer and easier for the little ‘uns to hold.”

    • Milica Cosic

      Can I let off fireworks on my rented property?

      Tenancy agreements often prohibit bonfires or fireworks, so check your agreement or ask your landlord if you are unsure.

      It is legal for a landlord to ban the use of fireworks in a tenancy agreement.

      Your agreement may also state that you must not engage in antisocial behaviour or cause noise pollution, which may include letting off fireworks.

      It is, therefore, a good idea to check with your landlord and neighbours if you plan to hold a fireworks display.

    • Milica Cosic

      Keep them away from the loud sounds

      For cats the loud bangs of fireworks can sound like the end of the world, so here is the best advice for trying to keep them happier and calmer on Bonfire Night.

      • Provide hiding places in your home, such as under some furniture or in a quiet corner.
      • Don’t try and tempt your cat out, as this will cause them to become more stressed.
      • Consider keeping them in – cats can become more stressed if they’re outside during fireworks.
      • Microchip your cats in case they’re startled and escape outside.
      • Milica Cosic

        Who was Guy Fawkes?

        Guy Fawkes – or Guido Fawkes as he would have called himself – was an English Catholic born around 1570 in York.

        During the 1570s, despite previously promising ‘not to make windows into people’s souls, Elizabeth I stepped up her persecution of Catholics in her realm after the Pope excommunicated her – making it not a sin for a Catholic to kill her.

        This embittered Fawkes who left the country to fight for Catholic Spain and later tried to drum up support for a Catholic rebellion without success.

        He later returned to England after James I&VI took the throne to take part in a planned rebellion organised by Robert Catesby. The plan was to detonate gunpowder under the Houses of Parliament – killing James and his eldest son Henry.

        Contrary to popular myth, Fawkes was not the ringleader – he was just the guy who was caught guarding the gunpowder when the plot was rumbled.

      • Milica Cosic

        Explained: Why was there a gunpowder plot?

        The gunpowder plot was centered around a group of Roman Catholic revolutionaries furious at the persecution of their faith in England.

        After 45 years of hounding under the reign of Elizabeth I the plotters had hoped their struggles would end but they failed to after the Protestant King James I ascended to the throne.

        Catesby and his friends planned to take matters into their own hands and kill the King and his ministers by blowing up the Palace of Westminster during the state opening of Parliament.

        The plotters were: Guy Fawkes, Thomas Bates, Robert and Thomas Wintour, Thomas Percy, Christopher and John Wright, Francis Tresham, Everard Digby, Ambrose Rookwood, Robert Keyes, Hugh Owen, John Grant and the man who organised the whole plot – Robert Catesby.

      • Milica Cosic

        Bonfire Night in the North East and Yorkshire

        Big Blaze 2021, Newcastle – November 6

        Illuminate the Gardens 2021, Sheffield – November 7

        Finkle & Green’s Stockton Firework Display, Stockton-on-Tees – November 7

        Crosland Hill, Huddersfield – November 7

        Mirfield Showground, Kirklees – November 6

        Bonfire & Fireworks Extravaganza, Bradford – November 6

      • Milica Cosic

        When can I buy fireworks?

        Due to concerns about their effect on animals, the elderly and how dangerous they can be if they are not handled properly the sale of fireworks is strictly controlled.

        Accoridng to Gov.uk, you can only buy fireworks (including sparklers) from registered sellers for private use on these dates:

        • 15 October to 10 November
        • 26 to 31 December
        • 3 days before Diwali and Chinese New Year

        At other times you can only buy fireworks from licensed shops.

        A life saver!

        A quick-thinking three-year-old girl saved her mum’s life after a bonfire triggered an asthma attack.

        Imogen bravely called 999 and directed an ambulance to the family home as her mum Kayleigh Robus, 29, struggled for breath.

        The pair were playing in the garden when the community carer suddenly felt her chest tighten and she was soon unable to speak. Terrified Kayleigh, of Burgess Hill, West Sussex, realised that the smoke from a nearby bonfire had triggered an asthma attack.

        The mum told The Argus: “I was playing in the garden with Imogen when suddenly I smelt smoke and straight away felt my chest tighten. I rushed inside the house and took puffs on my inhaler which helped at first but it wasn’t enough and I was struggling to breathe. I couldn’t breathe in or out, I couldn’t speak, I couldn’t do anything. It was horrific.”

        As Kayleigh battled for breath, her toddler amazingly dialled 999 and told an ambulance where they lived.

        Shocking moment fireworks launched at cops as protesters descend on Parliament

        THIS is the shocking moment fireworks were launched at police as hundreds of anti-Government protesters descended on the streets of London.

        Anarchists took to Parliament Square donning Guy Fawkes masks and setting off flares during the annual Million Mask March last night (5 November).

        A dozen people were arrested during the protest and eight officers were injured, police confirmed, calling the actions by rioters "unacceptable".

        In the footage, posted to Twitter, police are seen clashing with protesters as fireworks spiral into the crowd.

        The Met Police confirmed bystanders were "struck" by fireworks and warned of "very serious injuries".

        • Milica Cosic

          How old do I need to be to buy fireworks?

          “Adult” fireworks cannot be purchased by under 18s – this doesn’t include things like party poppers.

          The supermarkets are also only selling them in store only rather than online.

          Since 2019, Sainsbury’s has not sold any fireworks.

          The legal classification of fireworks is as follows:

          • Category 1s are fireworks which can be handled by children with adult supervision. Examples can include everything from party poppers and Christmas crackers to sparklers.
          • Category 2 or 3 fireworks are the standard fireworks you would see in displays such as standard rockets. It is illegal for anyone under the age of 18 to buy, handle or set up category 2 or 3 fireworks.
          • Category 4s are the dangerous types which can only be used by the professionals. These are banned for sale to the general public and can only be bought from specialist retailers.

          Dangers of garden fires

          Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service have released a video warning of the dangers of garden fires and how they could even result in prison time.

          In Derbyshire, firefighters were called out to 225 garden fires in this last year, with calls for fire-related incidents increasing substantially around Bonfire Night.

          Steve Ratcliffe, station manager, told Derbyshire Live: “We have seen an increase in garden fires across the whole county.

          “It has been quite a considerable increase and there has been a number of factors behind them. Lockdown through COVID has led a lot more people to be at home and a lot more people to tack garden jobs at home.”

          The dangerous first aid ‘advice’ you must ignore (Continued…)

          Burn from lighting bonfire with paraffin

          Myth: The best thing to put on a burn is butter.

          Clive revealed: “Putting butter or margarine on a burn could make the burn even worse as it effectively cooks it.”

          Ice also won’t help – it can actually add a cold burn on top of the hot burn.

          And don’t apply ice either, which can produce a cold burn on top of the hot burn.

          Fact: Place the burned area under running cold water for ten minutes to reduce pain and distress.

          Then wrap it loosely in cling film to reduce the risk of infection, and allow the area to continue cooling.

          “As a general rule, we advise anyone with a deep burn, or larger than a 50p piece to go down to casualty,” says Clive. “If in doubt call NHS direct on 0845 4647.”

          Be extremely careful when using paraffin to light a bonfire…

          The dangerous first aid ‘advice’ you must ignore

          We’ve collated some first aid tips and myths from St John Ambulance trainer Clive James to keep everyone safe this weekend…

          Child choking on a hotdog

          Myth: Put your fingers in their mouth or hang them upside down by their feet.

          Clive said that this could actually make the problem worse, as by putting fingers into the throat could push it down further.

          He said: “Hanging a child upside down is not only can it be very traumatic, it could also result in head injury if the child is dropped.”

          Fact: Stand or kneel behind the child and slap sharply on the back up to five times

          Clive explained: “If back slaps fail, move on to abdominal thrusts, stand or kneel behind the child,  put both arms around them and place one fist between the belly button and the end of the breast bone. 

          “Pull sharply inwards and upwards up to five times. If the child is still choking, call an ambulance and alternate between back blows and thrust until the blockage is removed.”

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