Jeff Bridges says he has lymphoma, cites good prognosis

Jeff Bridges, 70, reveals he has been diagnosed with lymphoma with message quoting his famous Big Lebowski character The Dude – but insists ‘the prognosis is good’

  • The Oscar winner revealed on Twitter on Monday that he’s been diagnosed with lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system
  • It’s unclear if Bridges has Hodgkin’s lymphoma or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma
  • Bridges said he’s ‘starting treatment’ and promised to keep his followers up to date on his recovery

Jeff Bridges says he is being treated for lymphoma and his prognosis is good.

The 70-year-old actor channeled his The Dude character from ‘The Big Lebowski’ in a statement on social media about the diagnosis Monday evening.

He said he understands the disease is serious. He expressed gratitude to his family, friends and medical team and promised to keep fans posted on his recovery.

Jeff Bridges says he is being treated for lymphoma and his prognosis is good

Bridges said he’s ‘starting treatment’ and promised to keep his followers up to date on his recovery

The actor channeled his The Dude character from ‘The Big Lebowski’ in a statement on social media about the diagnosis on Monday

‘As the Dude would say.. New S**T has come to light,’ he tweeted on Monday evening. ‘I have been diagnosed with Lymphoma. Although it is a serious disease, I feel fortunate that I have a great team of doctors and the prognosis is good. I’m starting treatment and will keep you posted on my recovery.’

‘I’m profoundly grateful for the love and support from my family and friends. Thank you for your prayers and well wishes. And, while I have you, please remember to go vote. Because we are all in this together. Love, Jeff.’

Bridges is currently in production on the action-drama series The Old Man, in which he stars in and is executive producing 

The seven-time Oscar nominee is known for his roles in Starman, True Grit, The Last Picture Show and many other films. 

He won an Academy Award in 2010 for Crazy Heart and was most recently nominated for playing a grizzled lawman in Hell or High Water.

The affable Bridges is considered Hollywood royalty, the son of actors Lloyd and Dorothy Bridges, who both died in 1998.

He said he understands the disease is serious and expressed gratitude to his family, friends, and medical team

WHAT IS LYMPHOMA?

Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymph nodes, which is the body’s disease-fighting network.

That network consists of the spleen, bone marrow, lymph nodes and thymus gland. 

There are various types of lymphoma, but two main ones: non-Hodgkin’s and Hodgkin’s.

Both have much better prognoses than many types of cancer. 

WHAT IS HODGKIN’S LYMPHOMA?

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a type of cancer that starts in the white blood cells. It is named after Thomas Hodgkin, an English doctor who first identified the disease in 1832.  

It affects around 1,950 people each year in the UK, and 8,500 a year in the US.

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is most common between the ages of 20 and 24, and 75 and 79. 

Five-year survival rates:

The survival rates are much more favorable than most other cancers. 

  • Stage 1: 90%
  • Stage 2: 90%
  • Stage 3: 80%
  • Stage 4: 65% 

Symptoms include: 

  • a painless swelling in the armpits, neck and groin 
  • heavy night sweating
  • extreme weight loss 
  • itching
  • shortness of breath 
  • coughing 

Risk factors: 

  • lowered immunity
  • a family history of the condition
  • smokers 
  • those who are overweight

Treatment: 

  • chemotherapy
  • radiotherapy
  • steroids 
  • stem cell or bone marrow transplants

WHAT IS NON-HODKIN’S LYMPHOMA?

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can occur anywhere in the body but is usually first noticed in the lymph nodes around sufferers’ necks.

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma affects around 13,700 new people every year in the UK. In the US, more than 74,600 people are diagnosed annually.

It is more common in males than females, and it is commonly diagnosed either in a patient’s early 20s or after the age of 55. 

Five-year survival rates:

Survival can vary widely with NHL. 

The general survival rate for five years is 70 percent, and the chance of living 10 years is approximately 60 percent. 

Symptoms include:

  • Painless swellings in the neck, armpit or groin
  • Heavy night sweating
  • Unexplained weight loss of more than one-tenth of a person’s body
  • Itching

Risk factors:

  • over 75
  • have a weak immune system
  • suffer from celiac disease
  • have a family history of the condition 
  • have had other types of cancer

Treatment:

It depends on the number and locations of the body affected by Non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Therapy typically includes chemotherapy.

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