Perfectly-timed photo captures RAF Typhoon creating its own cloud

Sonic PLUME! Perfectly-timed photo captures RAF Typhoon creating its own cloud at family airshow

This is the astonishing moment an RAF fighter jet created its own cloud at an airshow.

Photographer Dave Grubb managed to capture the phenomenon known as ‘fluffy jet’ as he photographed the Typhoon fighter jets on display at Torbay Airshow in Devon.

This unusual sight which only lasts a few milliseconds is caused by humid air entering a low-pressure area over the flying surfaces, reducing the density and temperature.

In turn this generates visible condensation when the Typhoon performs high turns and climbs, which looks like a fluffy cloud that engulfs the plane. 

Mr Grubb, from Worcester, said: ‘I was so pleased when I looked back at my camera and realised that I’d managed to capture this unique moment.’ 

The Typhoon Display Team is based at RAF Coningsby in Lincolnshire and uses the FGR.Mk 4 jet which most often works in UK and Faklkand Islands airspace. 

This incredible photograph taken in Torbay shows one of the RAF’s finest fighter jets creating a cloud around itself

Photographer Dave Grubb managed to capture the phenomenon known as fluffy jet as he photographed Typhoon jets

Mr Grubb took the picture at Torbay Airshow of the ‘fluffy jet’ phenomenon despite it only being visible for a few milliseconds

‘Fluffy jet’ is a colloquial name given to the process of condensation clouds forming around aircraft.

As air flows over an aircraft’s wing, there is a low pressure region above and a high pressure region below the wing.

This is due to Bernoulli’s Principle of Lift – that the faster speed of air along the top of a wing leads to reduced air pressure.

Humid air enters the low-pressure area over the flying surface, which reduces the density and temperature.

This happens when a plane pulls up and the pressure above the wing decreases.

As the pressure decreases, so does the temperature – making the moisture in the air condense.

This then creates visible condensation, which looks like a fluffy cloud that engulfs the plane.

The whole sight only lasts a few milliseconds and is therefore hard to capture on camera.

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