Thousands of Muslims gather at dawn in Birmingham to celebrate Eid

Eid Mubarak! Thousands of Muslims gather at dawn in Birmingham to mark the end of Ramadan as a new study reveals nearly two in five non-Muslim Brits will join in the Islamic celebration as well

  • Almost 30,000 Muslims gathered in Small Heath Park, Birmingham, from 6am to mark the end of Ramadan
  • It is one of the largest Eid celebrations in Europe, but has been cancelled for the last two years due to covid
  • Organsier Saleem Ahmed said it is a ‘relief’ to return to normality and host the ‘joyous occasion’ in the park

Almost 30,000 Muslims gathered in a Birmingham park today to take part in one of the largest Eid celebrations in Europe.

Worshippers from across the globe descended on Small Heath Park from 6am to mark the end of Ramadan.

Following a religious month of dawn to dusk fasting, Eid is a single day that signals the end of Ramadan and the start of the next month, Shawwal.

Organisers from Green Lane Masjid said that almost 30,000 people attended the event which is the first time it has been held since Covid forced it to be cancelled for two years.

Almost 30,000 Muslims gathered in Small Heath Park, Birmingham, to take part in one of the largest Eid celebrations in Europe this morning

Worshippers gathered at the Birmingham park from 6am to mark the end of Ramadan, and start of the next month, Shawwal

Family and friends gather for morning prayer, organised by Green Lane Masjid, and held for the first time in two years

Saleem Ahmed, project manager for Eid in the Park said: ‘Eid is a joyous occasion, where Muslims come together to celebrate, spend time with family and worship as a community.

‘It is a relief to have such an important celebration return to some normality after such a long time.’

A second celebration was held at Edgbaston Stadium in the city and saw 2,000 people attend for prayers which started at 7.45am.

They then descended on the numerous games available — which included fairground rides, miniature golf, cricket coaching and laser clay pigeon shooting.

A man sets down a prayer rug on the grass in the park, as he joins around 30,000 others to mark the end of Ramadan 

Saleem Ahmed, project manager for Eid in the Park said: ‘It is a relief to have such an important celebration return to some normality after such a long time’

Two boys stand in suits with waistcoats and bow ties, surrounded by thousands others, to celebrate the end of Ramadan

A young boy smiles as he sits among the 30,000-strong group for a morning of prayer to mark the arrival of Eid

A second celebration was held at Edgbaston Stadium in the city and saw 2,000 people attend for prayers which started at 7.45am. Pictured, attendees at Small Heath Park bow their heads

A child stands in the middle of a crowd, as worshippers pray at Eid in the Park, in Birmingham

One of Britain’s leading imams has said Eid celebrations will be ‘monumental’ this year as Muslims enjoy the first holiday without Covid-19 restrictions. Pictured, attendees mark Eid at Small Heath Park this morning

How is Eid celebrated?

Eid al-Fitr is an Islamic festival that marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan.

It begins when the new crescent moon is visible, with the month of Ramadan organised via the lunar cycle. 

Eid al-Fitr is a big celebration with the Salat al-Eid being recited in congregation and is often called out in parks, community centres or mosques. 

Muslims gather for morning prayer, before eating breakfast with their family and friends — their first meal in daylight in around a month. 

Celebrations last for three days  in the new month, Shawwal.  

Muslims also honour Eid by giving to charity and this is referred to as Zakat al-Fitr. 

Donations will be given to those who are not able to join in the feast and celebrate the breaking of the fast. 

Some families decorate their houses with lights, candles and colourful banners. 

Children are often given gifts called Eidi, sometimes in the form of money, accessories, food and flowers. 

One of Britain’s leading imams has said Eid celebrations will be ‘monumental’ this year as Muslims enjoy the first holiday without Covid-19 restrictions since the pandemic began. 

Qari Asim, chairman of the Mosques and Imams National Advisory Board, said many traditions which were ‘sorely missed’ over the last two years will finally return. 

Large crowds have also been pictured in Leeds and Bristol this morning.

Across the country, it is expected that nearly two in five Brits will celebrate the end of Ramadan today — making it the most inclusive Eid in the UK.

While one in 20 Brits is Muslim, a new study revealed that two in five non-Muslim Brits will join Muslim friends, colleagues and neighbours in celebrating the special festival this year.

The number of non-Muslims marking the ceremony has risen by three per cent compared to last year, as Brits become more supportive and understanding of the annual Islamic event.

Joint celebrations include sharing food, giving gifts and putting up Eid decorations.

A record 16 per cent will take Eid gifts such as sweets and cakes to Muslim friends while 20 per cent will give special Eid cards.

The study from family experts Channel Mum also revealed a quarter of non-Muslim families with close Muslim friends fasted for a day during the special festival this year, in support of their Muslim friends and neighbours.

Muslim social media influencer Nabiila Bee, from Birmingham, said: ‘Hearing so many non-Muslims are supporting Ramadan warms my heart.

Families celebrate Eid al-Fitr at Leeds Grand Mosque, West Yorkshire this morning, after the month of fasting came to a close

Worshippers arrive at Leeds Grand Mosque for morning prayer, following the end of the holy month of Ramadan

A man wearing a white thobe in Leeds Grand Mosque, West Yorkshire, during this morning’s prayers

Families and friends across the country will be celebrating Eid today after a month of fasting during Ramadan

Inside the Leeds Grand Mosque, men stand almost shoulder to shoulder in prayer, as they congregate this morning 

Qari Asim, chairman of the Mosques and Imams National Advisory Board, said many traditions which were ‘sorely missed’ over the last two years will finally return. Pictured, prayer at Leeds Grand Mosque

Two worshippers are pictured wearing face masks as they visit the mosque. This is the first time in two years that Eid has not been limited by covid restrictions 

People arrive at Leeds Grand Mosque and stow their shoes before the morning prayers, to mark the end of Ramadan 

Two men stand together, heads bowed in prayer, at the Leeds Grand Mosque this morning

Influencer Nabiila Bee’s guide to Eid for non-Muslim Brits 

1.Join in! Eid is about celebrating, sharing food and bringing communities together. You will find your Muslim neighbours will welcome you as Eid is about tolerance and community.

2. Ask questions. Non-Muslims should feel free to ask questions about Ramadan and Eid to their fellow Muslim friends if they are unsure about anything.. This opens a healthy dialogue and can maybe give a better understanding of why Muslims go on this spiritual journey during this particular month.

3. You can say ‘Eid Mubarak’. Saying ‘Happy Eid’ or ‘Eid Mubarak’ is a simple way to acknowledge the day.

4. Give gifts of Halal sweets or cakes. Muslims love to enjoy a sugary treat after a month of fasting so cakes or sweets are very popular! It’s customary to bring a gift but make sure its Halal, so no gelatine or pork products.

5. Dress to impress. Going to an Eid party? Looking our best at Eid is essential and we spend a long time planning our Eid outfits. Just remember to dress modestly 

‘Eid is the equivalent of Christmas in bringing Muslims together, so to see it uniting people from all communities bringing tolerance and understating is wonderful. It’s also a great excuse for a party.’ 

The 28-year-old hijabi celebrity is one of the UK’s fastest-growing social media stars, famed for her tutorials to tie headscarves, modest fashion and beauty hack across YouTube, TikTok and Instagram.

She has complied the five-point guide below, on how to non-Muslim Brits can support their Muslim friends during Eid:

1.Join in! Eid is about celebrating, sharing food and bringing communities together. You will find your Muslim neighbours will welcome you as Eid is about tolerance and community.

2. Ask questions. Non-Muslims should feel free to ask questions about Ramadan and Eid to their fellow Muslim friends if they are unsure about anything.. This opens a healthy dialogue and can maybe give a better understanding of why Muslims go on this spiritual journey during this particular month.

3. You can say ‘Eid Mubarak’. Saying ‘Happy Eid’ or ‘Eid Mubarak’ is a simple way to acknowledge the day.

4. Give gifts of Halal sweets or cakes. Muslims love to enjoy a sugary treat after a month of fasting so cakes or sweets are very popular! It’s customary to bring a gift but make sure its Halal, so no gelatine or pork products.

5. Dress to impress. Going to an Eid party? Looking our best at Eid is essential and we spend a long time planning our Eid outfits. Just remember to dress modestly 

Eid begins when the new crescent moon is visible, with Ramadan based on when a new moon is sighted by local religious authorities. 

Three days of celebrations began today, with Muslims gathering in mosques for prayers, before visiting family and friends to eat breakfast— their first meal in daylight in around a month. 

Eid al-Fitr is a big celebration with the Salat al-Eid being recited in congregation and is often called out in parks, community centres or mosques. 

In Muslim majority countries, the three-day celebration is an official government and school holiday. Some families decorate their houses with lights, candles and colourful banners. 

Children are often given gifts called Eidi, sometimes in the form of money, accessories, food and flowers.  

People hug and greet each other after Eid prayer in Bristol this morning, to mark the end of Ramadan 

Friends and family hug one another as Eid celebrations began this morning, after the holy month of Ramadan ended 

Worshippers pray outside in Bristol this morning, as the Salat al-Eid is read to the congregation 

 

Children join the morning prayers in Bristol, marking the start of three-days of celebration for Muslims

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