UK weather forecast latest: Brits set for 19C temperatures this week before Saharan plume brings ROASTING 28C heatwave

BRITAIN is set for a scorching 19C heatwave this week making parts of the country hotter than Rome. 

Temperatures will also be well above the average for March of 11C.

Dry skies today and tomorrow will be followed by sunshine and clear skies for most of Wednesday, the Met Office predicts.

The weekend may be chillier but experts said the run-up to Easter will be getting warmer.

Ex-BBC and Met Office forecaster John Hammond of weathertrending said: “Spring will be in the air, with a gentle breeze from the warming continent and temperatures rising through the teens.

“Wet weather will give way to sunshine, with a drier and warmer trend through mid-March.” 

A Met Office forecaster added: “After the the North-West's rain spreads on Wednesday, it looks fine and sunny from Thursday for the UK.

“From then to late March has temperatures mild to very mild for most, with dry conditions, although it may be chilly should winds tap into colder air across eastern Europe.”

Read our weather live blog for the latest news and forecasts…

  • Joseph Gamp

    Urgent hay fever warning to millions as pollen bomb set to hit

    IF you suffer from hay fever, this won’t be something you want to read…

    But the end of March can only mean one thing – a return of the irritating sniffles, streaming eyes and scratchy throats.

    This is because the tree pollen season begins, plaguing hay fever sufferers everywhere.

    Temperatures are starting to rise, bringing joy to many but hell for people with pollen allergies.

    The Met Office said: “Tree pollen occurs first, typically from late March to mid-May, and affects around 25 per cent of people.”

    “Most people are allergic to grass pollen (which actually has two peaks) and the season lasts from mid-May until July.

    “Weed pollen can be released at any time but the season typically covers the end of June to September.”

  • Louis Allwood

    Thanks for reading!

    Louis Allwood here, signing off from our live coverage.

    We hope you’ve enjoyed reading today’s rolling updates.

    I'm now passing over to my colleague Joseph Gamp who will be with you until 10pm.

  • Louis Allwood

    What is the Cheltenham Festival weather forecast?

    Expect some cracking sunshine this week in all days except Wednesday.

    For Ladies Day on Wednesday, rain is predicted all day.

    So, in keeping with tradition, bring a hat.

  • Louis Allwood

    Early April forecast

    For the final days of March, high pressure is likely to continue. This means that dry and fine weather is expected, although there is still a low chance of periods of wind and rain in the west.

    Into April, it is probable that the high pressure will slowly recede eastwards, with the winds coming from the west or southwest again, bringing some wet, possibly very wet weather at times, associated with some strong winds too.

    Bands of rain are likely to be interspersed with brighter and showery conditions.

    It is expected to remain mild or very mild, although short periods of colder conditions are possible.

  • Louis Allwood

    What plants and vegetables to plant now to make the most of the weather

    Fruit and Vegetables to plant in March

    Although many plant their peas later on in Spring, it is completely fine starting them off in March.

    Simply sow the peas outdoors, or in a cold frame.

    Once they have grown large enough to handle, transfer them into a their last growing spot.

    Normally carrots aren't planted until April, but if you'd like an early crop in June, go ahead and plant them in late March.

    If your soil is stony, opt for shorter varieties such as Chantenay, as you may end up with split roots.

    Flowers to plant in March

    Bare-root roses are usually planted during their dormant season.

    March is the last chance you have to plant them before the Spring wakes them up.

    Bare-root roses are usually less expensive than pot-grown roses, and will develop quickly if you plant them now.

    Wildflowers are super-easy when it comes to making your garden wildlife-friendly.

    They are fast-growing, low-maintenance, and a great way to suppress weeds.

  • Louis Allwood

    Tuesday to Thursday forecast

    Rain in the northwest Tuesday, fine elsewhere.

    Outbreaks of rain for many areas Wednesday, drier in the far southeast and northwest.

    Showers in the northwest Thursday, dry and sunny elsewhere.

  • Louis Allwood

    London forecast

    Dry and bright to start, with sunny spells for many.

    Cloud increasing through the morning, then occasional showers through the day.

    Winds remaining light, with temperatures a little above average with maximum temperatures of 14 °C.

    Showers dying out this evening, with clear spells developing in the south of the area, allowing a patchy grass frost for some.

    Remaining cloudier and milder elsewhere with minimum temperatures of 1 °C.

  • Louis Allwood

    Wednesday and Friday outlook

    Outbreaks of rain for many on Wednesday, some heavy.

    Thursday and Friday fine and dry for most, but some rain in the far northwest.

    Mild days but some overnight frost.

  • Louis Allwood

    Strong winds and rain forecasted for tomorrow

    Rain and strong winds for north and west Scotland and then Northern Ireland.

    Mostly fine and dry elsewhere with plenty of hazy sunshine, just a few showers in eastern England.

  • Louis Allwood

    Temperatures to rise

    On Wednesday temperatures will creep up to highs of 19C.

    Temperatures will remain in the high teens for St Patrick’s Day on Thursday and into the weekend.

    It comes after Brits flocked to the beaches over this weekend ahead of the warm week.

    They went to the coast in Dorset, Cornwall and other parts of the UK as temperatures rose into the high teens.

  • Louis Allwood

    What causes the Northern Lights?

    The Northern Lights, also known as aurora borealis, are the result of electrically charged particles from the sun, smashing into gaseous particles in our planet’s atmosphere.

    This solar flare is often joined by a coronal mass ejection – which is a huge expulsion of plasma from the sun’s outer layer.

    The massive burst of material from the sun prompts a geomagnetic storm, which brings the aurora to lower latitudes.

    The solar storms cause bright, colourful dancing lights in white, green, pink and purple that illuminate the sky and are considered an incredible sight. 

    Colour variations occur when different types of gas particles collide with the charged particles.

    The most common colour of the aurora is green, which is created when oxygen molecules about 60 miles above the ground react with the particles, whereas nitrogen causes a blue or purple hue.

  • Louis Allwood

    Northern Lights could be visible tonight, AGAIN!

    If you missed a rare chance to see the Northern Lights on Sunday, you may still have one last opportunity.

    Some northern parts of the UK might get lucky on Monday night, as long as the skies remain clear.

    Check out some of these stunning snaps taken last night.

  • Louis Allwood

    Run up to Easter will get warmer

    The weekend may be chillier but experts said the run-up to Easter will be getting warmer.

    Ex-BBC and Met Office forecaster John Hammond of weathertrending said: “Spring will be in the air, with a gentle breeze from the warming continent and temperatures rising through the teens.

    “Wet weather will give way to sunshine, with a drier and warmer trend through mid-March.” 

    A Met Office forecaster added: “After the the North-West's rain spreads on Wednesday, it looks fine and sunny from Thursday for the UK.

    “From then to late March has temperatures mild to very mild for most, with dry conditions, although it may be chilly should winds tap into colder air across eastern Europe.”

  • Louis Allwood

    Britain to be hotter than ROME as balmy 19C weather to sweep in

    BRITAIN will bask in a 19C heatwave over this week – making parts of the country hotter than Rome. 

    A 700-mile African heat burst will blow over the UK and send temperatures above the expected 15C in Italy’s capital.

    Temperatures will also be well above the average for March of 11C.

    Dry skies today and tomorrow will be followed by sunshine and clear skies for most of Wednesday, the Met Office predicts.

  • Louis Allwood

    Good morning

    Good morning, Louis Allwood here signing in to our rolling coverage of the weather until 6pm.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Weather outlook for Wednesday to Friday

    Outbreaks of rain for many on Wednesday, some heavy.

    Thursday and Friday fine and dry for most, but some rain in the far northwest.

    Mild days but some overnight frost.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Short weather summary for today

    The Met Office has released a short weather summary for today.

    It reads: "Cloud and rain moving east across Northern Ireland, much of Scotland and into northern England.

    Early fog patches in the south clearing, then sunny spells, but also scattered showers, a few heavy in far south."

  • Joseph Gamp

    A chilly and frosty start this morning

    The Met Office retweeted an earlier post that read: "A chilly start on Monday Morning, with a touch of frost in rural areas and the odd fog patch.

    "However, many of us will see some sunshine and it will soon warm up.

    "Cloudier and breezier across Northern Ireland and parts of Scotland with outbreaks of locally heavy rain."

  • Joseph Gamp

    Good morning

    Good morning, Joe Gamp here signing in to our live UK weather coverage.

    My colleague Louis Allwood will be with you from 10am.

  • Louis Allwood

    Wet and Windy start to April

    Some uncertainty heading into this period, with higher pressure to start which is expected to recede southwards leading to lower pressure in the north.

    A predominantly southerly airflow is expected and is likely to lead to wet and windy weather interspersed with brighter and showery conditions.

    Temperatures are likely to remain rather mild for most, although short periods of colder conditions are still possible.

  • Louis Allwood

    Forecast for next week

    Friday is expected to be mostly fine with little cloud.

    Winds largely light, apart from the far northwest where it is likely to be breezy, with a chance of showers.

    Temperatures expected to be near to above average and throughout the rest of the period, high pressure is likely to dominate.

    As a result, most areas should be dry, although breezy at times particularly in southern and western areas.

    Temperatures expected to be mild to very mild for most, however, it may become chilly by day should the winds tap into colder air across eastern Europe.

    The sunniest weather is expected to be in the south and east, although some overnight mist and fog is likely, as well as some low cloud around North Sea coasts.

  • Louis Allwood

    How does the week ahead shape up?

    Firstly there will be rain in the northwest moving east across some other northern areas, turning more showery on Monday .

    Sunny spells further south, with scattered showers developing, possibly heavy and mild in the south and east.

  • Louis Allwood

    Tuesday to Thursday forecast

    Rain in the northwest Tuesday, fine elsewhere.

    Outbreaks of rain for many areas Wednesday, drier in the far southeast and northwest.

    Showers in the northwest Thursday, dry and sunny elsewhere.

  • Louis Allwood

    20 Percent chance of seeing the Northern Lights

    The rare event has prompted Brits to plan to venture outside overnight, in a bid to capture the perfect shot of the aurora.

    Data from Nasa and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) suggests there is an 80 percent chance that Earth will experience a major space storm on March 14.

    Within its prediction, there is a 20 percent chance that the UK will be affected by the storm.

    The incoming CME could also cause power grid fluctuations with voltage alarms at higher latitudes, where the Earth is more exposed.

    The storms can wreak havoc on navigation systems and cause entire national power grids to grind to a halt.

  • Louis Allwood

    What causes the Northern Lights?

    The Northern Lights, also known as aurora borealis, are the result of electrically charged particles from the sun, smashing into gaseous particles in our planet's atmosphere.

    This solar flare is often joined by a coronal mass ejection – which is a huge expulsion of plasma from the sun's outer layer.

    The massive burst of material from the sun prompts a geomagnetic storm, which brings the aurora to lower latitudes.

    The solar storms cause bright, colourful dancing lights in white, green, pink and purple that illuminate the sky and are considered an incredible sight. 

    Colour variations occur when different types of gas particles collide with the charged particles.

    The most common colour of the aurora is green, which is created when oxygen molecules about 60 miles above the ground react with the particles, whereas nitrogen causes a blue or purple hue.

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