VIDEO: Hunt saboteur beats 81-year-old over the head with camera lens

Moment hunt saboteur beat an 81-year-old pensioner over the head with a camera lens as she is found guilty of assault

  • Alexandra Dennis was found guilty of assault by beating for beating a pensioner
  • Video shows how she lunged at the man, 81, and struck him in the head 
  • He fell to the ground yelling ‘you hit me’ as she was heard shouting abuse at him
  • The victim says he remains ’emotionally scarred’ by her ‘violent actions’ 

Video shows the moment a hunt saboteur who was found guilty of assault by beating attacked an 81-year-old man.

Saboteur Alexandra Dennis lunged at the elderly pensioner as he attempted to retrieve something from the ground just behind her and then struck him in the head with a video camera.

Her victim fell to the ground as Dennis was heard shouting abuse at him as the man, who disorientated and visibly shaken, says ‘you hit me’.

Dennis was found guilty of assault by beating after a trial at Weymouth Magistrates Court and fined £959, MailOnline has learned. The victim says he remains ’emotionally scarred’ by her ‘violent actions.’

Video shows the moment a hunt saboteur who was found guilty of assault by beating attacked an 81-year-old man

The Blackmore & Sparkford Vale Hunt had been out trail hunting in Holnest, Dorset on December 18, 2021 when they were attacked by the camouflage-wearing hunt saboteurs. 

Video footage, provided exclusively to MailOnline, shows how Dennis attacked the elderly victim as shocked members of the public tried to move her away from him.

A spokesperson for the Blackmore and Sparkford Vale Hunt, speaking on behalf of the shaken victim, told MailOnline the organisation is ‘relieved that justice had been done’. 

‘This shocking incident highlights the horrific abuse members of our community suffer at the hands of hunt saboteurs,’ the spokesperson said.

‘While he has recovered physically, the elderly victim understandably remains emotionally scarred by the violent actions of Alexandra Dennis.’

The spokesperson explained that for many – particularly elderly people living in rural areas – trail hunting remains an ‘important social activity.’

‘[Trail hunting] can be one of limited avenues of interaction in more isolated areas of the countryside,’ the representative stated.

‘Sadly, there are a small number of people who don’t understand this and go out of their way to intimidate and attack innocent people. We would like to thank the police and the CPS for their professionalism in helping to bring Dennis to justice’.

Alexandra Dennis lunged at the elderly pensioner as he attempted to retrieve something from the ground just behind her and then struck him in the head with a video camera

Video footage, provided exclusively to MailOnline, shows how Dennis attacked the elderly victim as shocked members of the public tried to move her away from him

Hunt saboteur recalls terrifying moment she was ploughed down by 4×4 in ‘hit-and-run’ during meet: Click here to read more 

Trail hunting was devised in the wake of the 2004 Hunting Act to legally replicate the outlawed sport of fox hunting as closely as possible.

Under the rules, horseback riders with dogs can legally follow trails laid with scent, instead of chasing a live animal.

However, if hounds should happen to pick up the scent of a fox and chase it as a result of the trail, then there are no legal consequences.

The League Against Cruel Sports claims trail hunting is a cover for illegal hunting, designed to deceive the authorities and make the prosecution of illegal hunters very difficult.

The 2004 Hunting Act banned hunting foxes with hounds, but there have been reports of breaches since.

Trail hunting is controversial and although animals aren’t actually being chased, injured or killed many animal rights activists publicly oppose the practice.

The Countryside Alliance, a rural campaigning organisation, argues Sunday’s attack further highlights how important it is that police take threats made by hunt saboteur groups ‘seriously.’ 

The man fell to the ground as Dennis was heard shouting abuse at him as the man, who disorientated and visibly shaken, says ‘you hit me’

Polly Portwin, who runs the organisation’s Campaign for Hunting, said:  ‘While small in numbers, hunt saboteurs are routinely aggressive and often violent towards many within the rural community. 

‘Hunt staff, who above all else work incredibly hard to maintain and protect the welfare of the animals in their care, regularly face spurious and false accusations from saboteur groups, as was reported in Wiltshire at the weekend. 

‘It cannot be right that these bullies are able to carry out their campaigns of terrorising law abiding rural people. 

She concluded: ‘We urge police across the countryside to take their activity incredibly seriously, both for the safety of the hunting community but also the wider public.’

Dennis was found guilty of assault by beating after a trial at Weymouth Magistrates Court and fined £959. The victim says he remains ’emotionally scarred’ by her ‘violent actions’

The Countryside Alliance, a rural campaigning organisation, argues Sunday’s attack further highlights how important it is that police take threats made by hunt saboteur groups ‘seriously’

Ms Portwin noted how two weeks ago police advised another hunt to move its activities following a ‘hate campaign against local clergy by hunt saboteurs.’

The hunt saboteurs had posted details of the group’s carol service at St George’s Church in Clun. They also shared the email address of Reverend Caroline Harrison and asked activists to get in touch and complain.

The hunt received messages from animal rights groups and activists across the globe, including in Canada and New Zealand. 

Despite the threats, the service still went ahead last weekend, Ms Portwin explained.  

A spokesperson for the United Pack has since criticised the activists, saying :’We were in no doubt that our carol service would go ahead this year.

‘It’s an important part of the festive calendar for many local people here, regardless of whether they follow hunting or not. We would never bow down to threats from online bullies but do understand just how unpleasant it can be for anyone targeted.’

The United Pack says last weekend’s event was ‘without doubt the best supported service’ the group has ‘ever had.’

Officials say attendance was ‘higher than usual’ and the group had more newcomers than in previous years – ‘which just reinforces the strength of rural, community spirit and this important time of year.’

The spokesperson added: ‘The sermon was wonderfully crafted and the 100 or so people in the congregation all agreed that the rural community in the Welsh Marches was far better off for a joyous and hearty service’.



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